Archive for January, 2021

Orange Strap Ends

Written by Tad. Posted in Trauma Strap Bags

Most of the trauma straps end with the end folded back and sewn to itself. As time has gone by, I have saved the ends of a bunch of straps. The other day, as I have been moved by Covid-19 isolation to get organized, I decided to use a bunch of the ends in bags, using them in a random fashion. Here is what they looked like.

Coconut-Oat Cookies

Written by Tad. Posted in Cookies

Sometimes, people in the emergency department would ask me to make eggs-free cookies. Other than coconut macaroons, it was hard to come up with something for them. Here is an egg-free cookie that is lovely to look at and delicious to eat.

Recipe By:

Food Network.com

Ingredients:

1½ cups unsweetened coconut flakes, divided
½ cup granulated sugar
12 tablespoons unsalted butter
¼ cup packed dark brown sugar
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon pure coconut extract
½ cup rolled oats
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped (I used more)

Directions:

1. Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350˚ F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

2. Toast the coconut in the oven or on the stove top until browned but not burned. Combine 1/2 cup coconut flakes with the granulated sugar in a blender and process until the sugar is finely ground and the coconut is in very small pieces. Set aside.

3.  Put the butter in a large microwave-safe bowl and microwave until melted. Let cool slightly.

4. Stir in the coconut-sugar mixture, brown sugar, salt, baking soda and coconut extract. Then stir in the oats. Add the flour and ½ cup coconut flakes and stir to combine.

5. Scoop heaping tablespoonfuls of dough and gently shape into 2-tablespoon balls. Arrange about 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. Bake, switching the pans halfway through, until the cookies are set around the edges and the centers are puffy, 16 to 18 minutes. Let cool 3 to 5 minutes on the pans, then remove to a rack to cool completely.

6. Put the chocolate in a microwave-safe bowl and microwave in 30-second intervals, stirring, until melted and smooth. Transfer to a small resealable plastic bag and snip a corner. Drizzle the chocolate over the cookies, then sprinkle with the toasted coconut. Let the chocolate set, 10 to 15 minutes.

His Brain on Meth

Written by Tad. Posted in Kooks

Police were called to a home where a naked 27-year-old man was causing a disturbance. He reportedly threw a dresser at the police when they tried to subdue him. To keep him safe and protect those caring for him, he was hogtied. To hogtie someone, the police cuff the wrists behind the person’s back and cuff the ankles. Then, the wrist cuffs and the ankle cuffs are connected together, behind, with a third set of cuffs, forcing the subject into a position with his back arched and his ankles fastened to his wrists behind his back. After restraining this man, the police loaded him in their squad car and headed for the emergency department.

I was called out to the ambulance loading dock because the police and ED staff were having trouble getting him out of the back of the police car. Hogtied, naked, sweaty and still fighting, he had thrown himself forward, off the back seat. His head was wedged under the back of the front seat with his rear up in the air. All I saw when I peeked into the car was his naked butt with his scrotum sticking up by his crack.

When we finally got the man onto a hospital gurney, I noted he was not moving any more. A quick check showed he had no pulse and was not breathing. This changed the nature of our situation profoundly. Instead of controlling a drug-addled patient, we had a patient in cardiac arrest.

We moved him immediately off the loading dock into the closest room in the emergency department where the police reluctantly removed his cuffs. I was then able to quickly assess him and give some orders including starting CPR, inserting an IV and getting him on the monitor. Since he was not breathing, I immediately passed a breathing tube into his windpipe and got him on a ventilator. As we got all that done, his heart, which had actually not stopped but had just gone to a very slow rate, was now fast and he was starting to wake up. Though that was good news for him, it also required immediate sedation so he would not pull out his IVs and breathing tube.

A more careful examination showed him to have abrasions on his extremities where the cuffs had been placed and a dislocated elbow, which had probably been suffered at some point during the fight to restrain him. After I stabilized him for admission to the ICU, I got his elbow back in joint and splinted. His testing was all negative except for methamphetamines in his urine.

Copyright © 2014 Bad Tad, MD